RELIEF SUBWAY LINE

The Time For Transit Commuting Relief Is Now!

RELIEF SUBWAY LINE

The Time For Transit
Commuting Relief Is Now!

With the Yonge Line and Bloor–Yonge station over capacity, commuters don’t have time to wait around while City Hall plays politics with transit. Toronto city planners and engineers have made it clear that the Relief Line is the most urgently needed transit project for Toronto. Now is the time to build the Relief Line. Show your support, and help ensure that the Relief Line becomes our government’s number-one transportation priority.

With the Yonge Line and Bloor–Yonge station over capacity, commuters don’t have time to wait around while City Hall plays politics with transit. Toronto city planners and engineers have made it clear that the Relief Line is the most urgently needed transit project for Toronto. Now is the time to build the Relief Line. Show your support, and help ensure that the Relief Line becomes our government’s number-one transportation priority.

The Relief Line Benefits 

19,200


Commuters at busiest point in AM rush hour; same usage as Yonge-University and Bloor-Danforth Lines

2x


faster trip times for Downtown-bound commuters

 

 

36%


less crowding on the Yonge Line

 

 

 

40%


fewer southbound transfers at Bloor–Yonge Station by westbound Bloor–Danforth Line commuters

What is the the Relief Line and what will it do?

 

Running from Sheppard Avenue East to the downtown core via Don Mills Road, the Relief Line is a proposed subway line that will provide commuters with significantly faster travel times and less crowding on the Yonge Line and at Bloor–Yonge Station.

 

Easier Bloor–Yonge transfer

Bloor–Yonge Station is over capacity, delaying all commuters who pass through this choke point. The Relief Line will give westbound Bloor–Danforth commuters a second option for transferring downtown, diverting them away from the crowded Bloor–Yonge Station. The result will be nearly half as many Bloor–Yonge Station transfers by these commuters. And because also Relief Line will bring less crowding to trains on the Yonge and Bloor–Danforth lines, commuters who still use Bloor–Yonge Station will have an easier time finding room on trains.

The Relief Line Benefits 

19,200

Commuters at busiest point in AM rush hour; same usage as Yonge-University and Bloor-Danforth Lines

2x

faster trip times for Downtown-bound commuters

36%

less crowding on the Yonge Line

40%

fewer southbound transfers at Bloor–Yonge Station by westbound Bloor–Danforth Line commute

What is the the Relief Line and what will it do?

 

Running from Sheppard Avenue East to the downtown core via Don Mills Road, the Relief Line is a proposed subway line that will provide commuters with significantly faster travel times and less crowding on the Yonge Line and at Bloor–Yonge Station.

 

Easier Bloor–Yonge transfer


Bloor–Yonge Station is over capacity, delaying all commuters who pass through this choke point. The Relief Line will give westbound Bloor–Danforth commuters a second option for transferring downtown, diverting them away from the crowded Bloor–Yonge Station. The result will be nearly half as many Bloor–Yonge Station transfers by these commuters. And because also Relief Line will bring less crowding to trains on the Yonge and Bloor–Danforth lines, commuters who still use Bloor–Yonge Station will have an easier time finding room on trains.

Without the Relief Line

All westbound Bloor-Danforth Line Commuters travel through the overcrowded Bloor-Yonge Station to get downtown. 

Travel-Flow-without-Relief-Line-1-1024x815

With the Relief Line

The relief Line will introduce a second option for westbound Bloor-Danforth commuters to get downtown, reducing congestion at the overcrowded Bloor-Yonge Station.

Travel-Flow-with-Relief-Line-2-1024x815

Less crowding on the Yonge and Bloor–Danforth Lines

The Relief Line will provide an alternative route downtown for commuters who currently use the Bloor-Danforth Line and the overcrowded Yonge Line. This means that commuters on these lines will enjoy a faster, more comfortable, and more reliable commute. No more watching full trains go by.

36%

Less crowding

on Yonge Line

Yonge-Capacity-Bar-Graph-01-1024x592

Without the Relief Line

 

All westbound Bloor-Danforth Line Commuters travel through the overcrowded Bloor-Yonge Station to get downtown. 

Travel-Flow-without-Relief-Line-1-1024x815

With the Relief Line

The relief Line will introduce a second option for westbound Bloor-Danforth commuters to get downtown, reducing congestion at the overcrowded Bloor-Yonge Station.

Travel-Flow-with-Relief-Line-2-1024x815

Less crowding on the Yonge and Bloor–Danforth Lines

 

The Relief Line will provide an alternative route downtown for commuters who currently use the Bloor-Danforth Line and the overcrowded Yonge Line. This means that commuters on these lines will enjoy a faster, more comfortable, and more reliable commute. No more watching full trains go by.

36%

Less crowding

on Yonge Line

Yonge-Capacity-Bar-Graph-01-1024x592

Get downtown up to twice as fast

 

The Relief Line will introduce a new, rapid connection to Downtown Toronto, enabling commuters to get Downtown more than twice as fast.

Select locations using our interactive map to see the time savings the Relief Line will deliver.

Get downtown up to twice as fast

 

The Relief Line will introduce a new, rapid connection to Downtown Toronto, enabling commuters to get Downtown more than twice as fast.

Select locations using our interactive map to see the time savings the Relief Line will deliver.

*via Eglinton Crosstown
How were travel time savings calculated?

 

 Substantial economic benefits

 

Metrolinx found that the Relief Line, largely due it its substantial reductions in commute times, would add $13 Billion to our economy.

More than
$13 Billion

in net economic benefit.

Substantial economic benefits

More than
$13 Billion

in net economic benefit.

 

Metrolinx found that the Relief Line, largely due it its substantial reductions in commute times, would add $13 Billion to our economy.

A well-used rapid transit link for Toronto

 

Because the Relief Line will run through numerous high-density residential and employment areas, and will intersect many of the TTC's most used surface routes, the Relief Line will have nearly the same usage as the Yonge-University and Bloor-Danforth subway lines when it opens.

A well-used rapid transit link for Toronto

 

Because the Relief Line will run through numerous high-density residential and employment areas, and will intersect many of the TTC's most used surface routes, the Relief Line will have nearly the same usage as the Yonge-University and Bloor-Danforth subway lines when it opens.

Relief-Line-Usage-Comparison-Chart-01-1-1024x539
Relief-Line-Usage-Comparison-Chart-01-1-1024x539

19,200

Relief Line commuters at busiest point per hour

17 km

Of new rapid transit

 

Up to 14

Stations on the Relief Line

19,200

Relief Line commuters at busiest point per hour

17 km

Of new rapid transit

Up to 14

Stations on the Relief Line

Why is now the time for the Relief Line?

Yonge Line is at capacity

The Yonge Line is operating significantly over capacity. As far north as Eglinton Station it is common for trains to be so full that commuters can't board, and the situation only gets worse farther south on the line. Committed service improvements, such as our new Toronto Rocket trains, Automatic Train Control, and the extension of the University-Spadina Subway will divert some riders away from the overcrowded Yonge Line and increase line capacity.

Yonge-2031-capacity-01-01-01-1024x358_2

* Source: Metrolinx Yonge Relief Network Study. This estimated ridership is the expected 2031 Yonge Line ridership with Relief Line (20,700 pphpd) and the expected impact of the Yonge North Subway Extension on Yonge Line peak point/hour/direction ridership (2400 pphpd).

While these are good investments, they will not adequately relieve Yonge Line. In 2031,once approved transit plans are implemented, demand on the Yonge Line will be at 96% of capacity dangerously close to the breaking point, and leaving no room for future growth. The Relief Line is a critical investment that will divert significant demand away from the Yonge Line,enabling a third less crowding, and allowing everyone to travel around the city easier.

Bruce McCuaig

Metrolinx CEO

“While the relief line will be geographically located in the downtown area, its purpose is to open up possibilities throughout the region..."

 

View article

Jennifer Keesmaat

Toronto Chief Planner

"Everyone knows we need to build this infrastructure... We need a real alignment of political parties and political interests in order to drive this forward..."

View article

Andy Byford

TTC CEO

"My personal view is, my strong professional view is that we need to be taking action [on the Relief Line] now..."

 

View article

Why is now the time for the Relief Line?

 

Yonge Line is at capacity

The Yonge Line is operating significantly over capacity. As far north as Eglinton Station it is common for trains to be so full that commuters can't board, and the situation only gets worse farther south on the line. Committed service improvements, such as our new Toronto Rocket trains, Automatic Train Control, and the extension of the University-Spadina Subway will divert some riders away from the overcrowded Yonge Line and increase line capacity.

Yonge-2031-capacity-01-01-01-1024x358_2

* Source: Metrolinx Yonge Relief Network Study. This estimated ridership is the expected 2031 Yonge Line ridership with Relief Line (20,700 pphpd) and the expected impact of the Yonge North Subway Extension on Yonge Line peak point/hour/direction ridership (2400 pphpd).

While these are good investments, they will not adequately relieve Yonge Line. In 2031,once approved transit plans are implemented, demand on the Yonge Line will be at 96% of capacity dangerously close to the breaking point, and leaving no room for future growth. The Relief Line is a critical investment that will divert significant demand away from the Yonge Line,enabling a third less crowding, and allowing everyone to travel around the city easier.

Bruce McCuaig

Metrolinx CEO

“While the relief line will be geographically located in the downtown area, its purpose is to open up possibilities throughout the region..."

View article

Jennifer Keesmaat

Toronto Chief Planner

"Everyone knows we need to build this infrastructure... We need a real alignment of political parties and political interests in order to drive this forward..."  

View article

Andy Byford

TTC CEO

"My personal view is, my strong professional view is that we need to be taking action [on the Relief Line] now..."

View article

"We believe strongly that the relief line up to Sheppard and Don Mills will be the most important infrastructure upgrade in Toronto since the Bloor-Danforth line opened. If you look at Metrolinx’s study, you will see this line is projected to have about the same ridership as the Yonge-University and the Bloor-Danforth lines when it opens around 2031." 

"We believe strongly that the relief line up to Sheppard and Don Mills will be the most important infrastructure upgrade in Toronto since the Bloor-Danforth line opened. If you look at Metrolinx’s study, you will see this line is projected to have about the same ridership as the Yonge-University and the Bloor-Danforth lines when it opens around 2031." 

Increased crowding at Bloor-Yonge Station

 


Bloor-Yonge Station is the most used and most important station on Toronto's rapid transit network, with more than 23,000 commuters travelling through the station at is busiest hour today. Unfortunately, rush hour crowding at this station has reached critical levels. Typical rush hours at Bloor-Yonge Station force tens of thousands of commuters to squeeze together as they wait for the next train to come. Perhaps more so than any other rapid transit station in Toronto, commuters at Bloor-Yonge have to watch multiple full trains pass by before they can find enough room to board. And with thousands of commuters standing inches from the edge of the platform, this crowding is a significant public safety concern.

 

If we don’t act now the situation at Bloor-Yonge will become significantly worse. Crowding at Bloor-Yonge Station is expected to increase 60% by 2031. And as crowding increases, so does the time that trains spend in the station, further reducing the capacity of the Yonge Line.

 

The biggest contributor to the increase in Bloor-Yonge Station crowding will be downtown bound Bloor-Danforth Line commuters coming from the east. The Relief Line will give these commuters a second option for travelling downtown, cutting Bloor-Yonge Station activity by these commuters by nearly half.

Increased crowding at Bloor-Yonge Station


Bloor-Yonge Station is the most used and most important station on Toronto's rapid transit network, with more than 23,000 commuters travelling through the station at is busiest hour today. Unfortunately, rush hour crowding at this station has reached critical levels. Typical rush hours at Bloor-Yonge Station force tens of thousands of commuters to squeeze together as they wait for the next train to come. Perhaps more so than any other rapid transit station in Toronto, commuters at Bloor-Yonge have to watch multiple full trains pass by before they can find enough room to board. And with thousands of commuters standing inches from the edge of the platform, this crowding is a significant public safety concern.

 

If we don’t act now the situation at Bloor-Yonge will become significantly worse. Crowding at Bloor-Yonge Station is expected to increase 60% by 2031. And as crowding increases, so does the time that trains spend in the station, further reducing the capacity of the Yonge Line.

 

The biggest contributor to the increase in Bloor-Yonge Station crowding will be downtown bound Bloor-Danforth Line commuters coming from the east. The Relief Line will give these commuters a second option for travelling downtown, cutting Bloor-Yonge Station activity by these commuters by nearly half.

60% more crowding at Bloor-Yonge Station by 2031

60% more crowding at Bloor-Yonge Station by 2031

Toronto's Economic Future

 

 

Downtown Toronto, the centre of Toronto's economic activity, accounts for a third of Toronto's jobs and more than half of the city's economy (GDP). Within 15 years it's expected that the downtown population will nearly double, while downtown employment increases 28%. These factors contribute to a 55% increase in demand for downtown-bound trips within 15 years.

With our roadways and transit lines downtown at capacity, we risk stifling the economic growth of Downtown Toronto and the entire Greater Toronto Area without the Relief Line. Work on the Relief Line must begin now to keep Toronto's economy strong.

Toronto's Economic Future

 

Downtown Toronto, the centre of Toronto's economic activity, accounts for a third of Toronto's jobs and more than half of the city's economy (GDP). Within 15 years it's expected that the downtown population will nearly double, while downtown employment increases 28%. These factors contribute to a 55% increase in demand for downtown-bound trips within 15 years.

With our roadways and transit lines downtown at capacity, we risk stifling the economic growth of Downtown Toronto and the entire Greater Toronto Area without the Relief Line. Work on the Relief Line must begin now to keep Toronto's economy strong.

Show your support for the Relief Line

 

We need your help to ensure that the Relief Line becomes Toronto's top transportation priority.

Show your support for the Relief Line

 

We need your help to ensure that the Relief Line becomes Toronto's top transportation priority.

Your Support is Important

Your Support is Important

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Donate

 

Your donations make this campaign for the Relief Line possible. TRLA needs donations to support this website, as well as for purchasing lawn signs and other promotional materials. Donate to the Toronto Relief Line Alliance with any major credit card, or through your PayPal account, by clicking the button below:

Note: The Toronto Relief Line Alliance is not a registered charitable organization and cannot issue a tax receipt for your donation.

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Order a Lawn Sign

Help us get the word out about the Relief Line: Display your support of the Relief Line to neighbours and local politicians.

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Volunteer

 

Are you looking to play a major part in transforming Toronto? Are you willing to donate your time to advocate for the Relief Line? If so, Toronto Relief Line Alliance wants you! Sign up to volunteer, and help us fight to make the Relief Line a reality.

Please fill out this form to allow us to become aquatinted with you, and to assist us with work planning. We're looking to accept as many volunteers as possible.

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Write to your politicians

Send a letter to local politicians - let your support of the Relief Line known. Simply fill out our convenient email form, and we'll make sure it gets sent to relevant politicians.

 

The Relief Line will be essential to Toronto's economic future. 

With the Subway approaching its breaking point by 2030, both the government and the people must act now.

The Relief Line will be essential to Toronto's economic future. 

With the Subway approaching its breaking point by 2030, both the government and the people must act now.

Relief Line FAQ

Who is Toronto Relief Line Alliance

"The Toronto Relief Line Alliance is a group of over 20 citizen advocates across Toronto. Co-founded by Louis Mark and others in multiple industries outside of transit, and advised by multiple longtime transit advocates. Contact us at info@relieflinealliance.ca"

 

Where was the information on this website sourced from?

All data on this website has been sourced from Metrolinx and City of Toronto. The catalogue of works cited, as well as our methodology for the travel time estimations can be found here.

 

Where did the idea of building the Relief Line to Don Mills originate?

The idea most recently was studied in Metrolinx's Yonge Relief Network Study, but has been a part of transit planner proposals in the City of Toronto for several decades.

 

Is the Relief Line funded?

No, the Relief Line hasn't received any funding commitments from any levels of government. Toronto Relief Line Alliance needs the help of people like you to ensure that building the Relief Line from Sheppard to downtown becomes the #1 GTA transportation priority of all levels of government.

 

Won't SmartTrack and GO RER provide the same crowding relief?

SmartTrack and GO RER are complimentary, but cannot replace the Relief Line. More relief than what GO RER and SmartTrack can provide is needed. Metrolinx's Yonge Relief Network Study estimates that RER+, a plan similar to SmartTrack, will attract only 400 riders from the Yonge Line at peak hour. This is equal only 3.4% of the relief that the Relief Line to Sheppard & Don Mills will provide.As plans evolve for SmartTrack, official staff reports will be used to update TRLA numbers.

Do we know exactly where the Relief Line will go?

Final routing is still being determined by the City of Toronto and Metrolinx. Roughly, the Relief Line TRLA is advocating for will start at Sheppard and Don Mills, run south along Don Mills Road to intersect the Eglinton Crosstown, then southwest to intersect the Bloor-Danforth Line in the Pape & Danforth area, and finally continue southwest to a terminal at City Hall, in the downtown core.

 

How realistic is financing of the line?

Very realistic. The Ontario Liberals have strongly indicated that they'll fund the Relief Line, from Downtown to Danforth, which would cost $3.5 Billion. The Relief Line to Sheppard and Don Mills cost $7.4 Billion, leaving a $3.9 Billion gap. A significant part of the platform of the federal Liberal government was increased infrastructure spending, so we believe that they would be very likely to contribute to this project, the most important rapid transit expansion in Toronto since the 1960s. If the federal government matched a potential $3.5 Billion provincial contribution, we'd be within striking distance of fully funding this line.

 

What stage are we in building the Relief Line?

The City of Toronto and Metrolinx are working together on assessing Relief Line options. As of now, the City of Toronto is assessing a truncated Relief Line running from City Hall to Danforth & Pape. This truncated line will provide only half the relief to Yonge Line, while providing minimal, if any, improvement to commute times for commuters coming from north of Bloor Street/Danforth Avenue. We need help from people like you to ensure that building the complete Relief Line, to Sheppard and Don Mills, is the top transportation priority for our government.

 

Contact us
email: info@relieflinealliance.ca
Twitter: @reliefline
Facebook: facebook.com/TOReliefLineAlliance/

Relief Line FAQ

 

Who is Toronto Relief Line Alliance

"The Toronto Relief Line Alliance is a group of over 20 citizen advocates across Toronto. Co-founded by Louis Mark and others in multiple industries outside of transit, and advised by multiple longtime transit advocates. Contact us at info@relieflinealliance.ca"

 

Where was the information on this website sourced from?

All data on this website has been sourced from Metrolinx and City of Toronto. The catalogue of works cited, as well as our methodology for the travel time estimations can be found here.

 

Where did the idea of building the Relief Line to Don Mills originate?

The idea most recently was studied in Metrolinx's Yonge Relief Network Study, but has been a part of transit planner proposals in the City of Toronto for several decades.

 

Is the Relief Line funded?

No, the Relief Line hasn't received any funding commitments from any levels of government. Toronto Relief Line Alliance needs the help of people like you to ensure that building the Relief Line from Sheppard to downtown becomes the #1 GTA transportation priority of all levels of government.

 

Won't SmartTrack and GO RER provide the same crowding relief?

SmartTrack and GO RER are complimentary, but cannot replace the Relief Line. More relief than what GO RER and SmartTrack can provide is needed. Metrolinx's Yonge Relief Network Study estimates that RER+, a plan similar to SmartTrack, will attract only 400 riders from the Yonge Line at peak hour. This is equal only 3.4% of the relief that the Relief Line to Sheppard & Don Mills will provide.As plans evolve for SmartTrack, official staff reports will be used to update TRLA numbers.

 

Do we know exactly where the Relief Line will go?

Final routing is still being determined by the City of Toronto and Metrolinx. Roughly, the Relief Line TRLA is advocating for will start at Sheppard and Don Mills, run south along Don Mills Road to intersect the Eglinton Crosstown, then southwest to intersect the Bloor-Danforth Line in the Pape & Danforth area, and finally continue southwest to a terminal at City Hall, in the downtown core.

 

How realistic is financing of the line?

Very realistic. The Ontario Liberals have strongly indicated that they'll fund the Relief Line, from Downtown to Danforth, which would cost $3.5 Billion. The Relief Line to Sheppard and Don Mills cost $7.4 Billion, leaving a $3.9 Billion gap. A significant part of the platform of the federal Liberal government was increased infrastructure spending, so we believe that they would be very likely to contribute to this project, the most important rapid transit expansion in Toronto since the 1960s. If the federal government matched a potential $3.5 Billion provincial contribution, we'd be within striking distance of fully funding this line.

 

What stage are we in building the Relief Line?

The City of Toronto and Metrolinx are working together on assessing Relief Line options. As of now, the City of Toronto is assessing a truncated Relief Line running from City Hall to Danforth & Pape. This truncated line will provide only half the relief to Yonge Line, while providing minimal, if any, improvement to commute times for commuters coming from north of Bloor Street/Danforth Avenue. We need help from people like you to ensure that building the complete Relief Line, to Sheppard and Don Mills, is the top transportation priority for our government.

 

Contact Us

 

 

Contact Us

Your donations make this campaign for the Relief Line possible.